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Landcare is a non-governmental community movement dedicated to preventing land degradation and achieving sustainable land management. It consists of a network of local volunteer groups of which there are over 1700 in New South Wales alone. Each group works to find local solutions to local problems such as salinity, soil degradation, animal pests, weeds, vegetation loss, waterside erosion, poor water quality, coastal degradation and urban land degradation. If you appreciate how lucky we are in the Helensburgh district to enjoy a relatively unspoiled bush environment you should also be aware that it is under serious threat. read more

Saturday, 7 July 2018

Be Weed Wise - Japanese Sacred Bamboo

Japanese sacred bamboo (Nandina domestica)

Native to eastern Asia, Japanese sacred bamboo is considered an environmental weed in NSW. This species is currently of most concern in the wider Sydney and Blue Mountains region in central New South Wales. It is currently not very widespread or common, but its abundance and range is increasing. It is also an invasive weed in large parts of south-eastern USA where it is displacing native vegetation.


Sacred Bamboo is generally grown for its foliage which has colourful red and green leaves. Small, white flowers are followed by red berries in autumn. It was a popular planting around a certain takeaway at one time. Birds spread the berries into bushland, and that is when it becomes a problem. Many reports also suggest that the berries are toxic to a range of animals, including dogs, cats and cattle. It has been known to kill birds when they gorge on the berries.


Control: remove and bag the berries and place them in your red bin. The whole plant can then be dug out and placed in the green bin.

Grow Me Instead

Honey myrtle Melaleuca linariifolia ‘Little Red’ A dense compact shrub with small leaves and bright red new growth throughout the warmer months.


Dwarf willow peppermint Agonis flexuosa ‘Nana' is a highly attractive, compact, evergreen shrub that produces willow-like foliage with red new growth and small white flowers in Spring.


Dwarf sacred bamboo Nandina domestica ‘Nana’ There are a few cultivars available that do not produce seeds, and still provide the contrasting red foliage.

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